NOVA Welsh Art Exhibition moves to Aberystwyth

‘Nuclear Decay’ by Jessica Lloyd-Jones is now on show at Aberystwyth Art Centre as part of NOVA Welsh Art Exhibition
25 January- 1 April 2018 
‘Nuclear Decay’ is a corroded cast replica of a Magnox nuclear fuel element, developed in response to the decommissioning of Wylfa Nuclear power station, Anglesey. Nova aims to support and promote excellence in emerging Welsh art. Selected artists are part of the inaugural Nova exhibition 2017 which is currently on show at Aberystwyth Arts Centre. 
Also in the show is Alana Tyson’s ‘Look After Each Other’ vinyl floor piece, Welsh language version, see below.

Hinkley Point, the story so far

Click on the link above for an overview of the Hinkley Point story.

In the meantime in Anglesey Horizon have applied for planning permission to remove all hedges, walls and natural features from a massive area just so as to be ready to build a new NPS should they get the go-ahead. Of course they are recording everything and plan to rebuild and replant every missing item should they be unsuccessful in their project. I am trying to get hold of their records – an item by item drawing of everything down to the last hedgerow plant and stone should be quite interesting.

Sonic Radiations: In search of a nuclear musicology

A selection of radioactive vinyl. Commissioned by Z33 House For Contemporary Art in the context of the expo ‘Perpetual Uncertainty’.

It’s a trip through children’s records about atomic energy, pro-nuclear interviews, thematic ‘library music’ and toxic electronics. In addition a small brochure with liner notes on each selection will be available at the expo, a comprehensive and diverse exhibition on a delicate but controversial topic.

Discussion of work including Power in the Land at Oriel Môn

Last night I was invited to speak to a group of people interested in contemporary art (CCC Môn) at Oriel Môn, Llangefni. The meeting provided an opportunity to talk about my work around running and the body, Power in the Land and also the upcoming residency in Chile. The meeting was in welsh and it was great to be able to talk with artists, the Director of Oriel Môn, the Collections Manager (Ian who supported us with the archival exhibition) and many others about the various work and in particular Power in the Land. There was a good discussion afterwards including the future of Wylfa (both sites) and issues surrounding it. Many thanks to Brenda and Tecs.

My research continues around Lithium and its production in the Atacama Desert – requesting entry to one of the plants in particular. Lithium is termed as the ‘new petroleum’ given its vital role in the manufacture of rechargeable batteries for electric cars. It is a highly desirable mineral! Chile and Bolivia are currently major producers and the effectiveness of producing lithium carbonate from salt brines is so favourable that most hard rock mining operations have been priced out of the market.

Lithium production in the Atacama Desert

Lithium Production Plant, Atacama Desert, Chile

The Life Scientific: Steve Cowley on Nuclear Fusion @bbcradio4

From BBC Radio 4 today:

Steve Cowley has said that “fusion is arguably the perfect way to power the world”. But he’s had to add that “it is hard to make fusion work. Indeed, after more than 60 years of fusion research, no device has yet made more energy than it consumes”.

But Steve Cowley isn’t giving up. He’s spent over 30 years working towards making nuclear fusion a viable way of generating energy. Steve Cowley has done theoretical research on how to contain the incredibly hot material you need to get fusion going. As the Director of the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy he guided the British contribution to research. And he has led the UK’s participation in ITER, an international experimental reactor being built in France that is planned to be the next step towards making nuclear fusion commercially viable.

Jim al-Khalili discusses with Steve Cowley, now President of Corpus Christi College in Oxford, why nuclear fusion, which has such promise as a clean form of energy with no dangerous waste, has proved so hard to achieve.


Drawing on the Land :Archaeology at Wylfa


Wylfa is currently the site of one of the largest archaeological digs in Europe, as a statutory requirement of the proposed new power station development. Volunteers are here digging a section of a neolithic henge, a massive circular ditch around the crest of a hill.DSC_0173Each ‘event’ on the site has to be accurately recorded by meticulous measured drawings. Here, below, artist and fellow volunteer Trish Bould has prepared the site for detailed recording of a round house just outside the circular henge. This has been identified after first of all a geo-physical survey, secondly, a visual identification of slight variations of colour in the soil, ringed in spray paint, and then many days of patient scraping away at stake-holes to reveal the individual stake holes in their circular form. The process of digging is like sculpture in reverse while the process of revealing and recording is like drawing on the land.DSC_0165DSC_0134DSC_0164Even the little measured recording drawings of each stake-hole have their own fascination as we enter into the discipline of another kind of drawing process.double stake holes